gnustep-base (1.22.1-4) manpage-fixes.patch

Summary

 Tools/autogsdoc.1 |   56 ++++++++++++++++++++++++++----------------------------
 Tools/cvtenc.1    |   10 ++++-----
 Tools/defaults.1  |    8 +++----
 Tools/gdomap.8    |    8 +++----
 Tools/pldes.1     |   14 ++++++-------
 5 files changed, 47 insertions(+), 49 deletions(-)

    
download this patch

Patch contents

2009-08-09  Yavor Doganov  <yavor@gnu.org>

	* Tools/autogsdoc.1:
	* Tools/cvtenc.1:
	* Tools/defaults.1:
	* Tools/gdomap.8:
	* Tools/pldes.1: Various minor formatting fixes.


--- gnustep-base.orig/Tools/autogsdoc.1
+++ gnustep-base/Tools/autogsdoc.1
@@ -242,17 +242,17 @@
 indent it nicely ... the reformatting is
 .I not
 performed on any text inside an <example> element.  When the text is
-reformatted, it is broken into whitespace separated
-'words' which are then subjected to some extra processing ...
+reformatted, it is broken into whitespace separated \*(lqwords\*(rq
+which are then subjected to some extra processing ...
 .IP "" 4
 Certain well known constants such as YES, NO, and nil are enclosed in <code>
-... </code> markup.
+\&... </code> markup.
 .IP "" 4
 The names of method arguments within method descriptions are enclosed in
 <var> ... </var> markup.
 .IP "" 4
 Method names (beginning with a plus or minus) are enclosed in <ref...>
-... </ref> markup.  E.g. "-init" (without the quotes) would be
+\&... </ref> markup.  E.g. "\-init" (without the quotes) would be
 wrapped in a GSDoc reference element to point to the init method of the
 current class or, if only one known class had an init method, it would refer
 to the method of that class.  Note the fact that the method name must be
@@ -263,7 +263,7 @@
 brackets) are enclosed in <ref...> ... </ref> markup.
 e.g. '[NSObject-init]', will create a reference to the init method of NSObject
 (either the class proper, or any of its categories), while
-'[(NSCopying)-copyWithZone:]', creates a reference to a method in the
+\&'[(NSCopying)-copyWithZone:]', creates a reference to a method in the
 NSCopying protocol.  Note that no spaces must appear between the square
 brackets in these specifiers.  Protocol names are enclosed in round
 brackets rather than the customary angle brackets, because GSDoc is an XML
@@ -278,18 +278,18 @@
 
 .SH ARGUMENTS AND DEFAULTS
 .P
-The tool accepts certain user defaults (which can of course be supplied as
-command-line arguments by prepending '-' before the default name and giving
-the value afterwards, as in -Clean YES):
+The tool accepts certain user defaults (which can of course be
+supplied as command-line arguments by prepending '\-' before the
+default name and giving the value afterwards, as in \-Clean YES):
 .IP "\fBClean" 4
 If this boolean value is set to YES, then rather than generating
 documentation, the tool removes all GSDoc files generated in the
-project, and all html files generated from them (as well as any
-which would be generated from GSDoc files listed explicitly),
-and finally removes the project index file.
-The only exception to this is that template GSDoc files (i.e. those
-specified using "-ConstantsTemplate ...", "-FunctionsTemplate ..."
-arguments etc) are not deleted unless the CleanTemplates flag is set.
+project, and all html files generated from them (as well as any which
+would be generated from GSDoc files listed explicitly), and finally
+removes the project index file.  The only exception to this is that
+template GSDoc files (i.e. those specified using
+"\-ConstantsTemplate ...", "\-FunctionsTemplate ..."  arguments etc)
+are not deleted unless the CleanTemplates flag is set.
 .IP "\fBCleanTemplates" 4
 This flag specifies whether template GSDoc files are to be removed
 along with other files when the Clean option is specified.
@@ -312,21 +312,19 @@
 .I body
 element) in the template.
 .IP "\fBDeclared" 4
-Specify where headers are to be documented as being found.
-The actual name produced in the documentation is formed by appending
-the last component of the header file name to the value of this
-default.
-If this default is not specified, the full name of the header file
-(as supplied on the command line), with the HeaderDirectory
-default prepended, is used.
-A typical usage of this might be '"-Declared Foundation"'
-when generating documentation for the GNUstep base library.  This
-would result in the documentation saying that NSString is declared
-in 'Foundation/NSString.h'
+Specify where headers are to be documented as being found.  The actual
+name produced in the documentation is formed by appending the last
+component of the header file name to the value of this default.  If
+this default is not specified, the full name of the header file (as
+supplied on the command line), with the HeaderDirectory default
+prepended, is used.  A typical usage of this might be '"\-Declared
+Foundation"' when generating documentation for the GNUstep base
+library.  This would result in the documentation saying that NSString
+is declared in 'Foundation/NSString.h'
 .IP "\fBDocumentAllInstanceVariables" 4
 This flag permits you to generate documentation for all instance
 variables.  Normally, only those explicitly declared 'public' or
-'protected' will be documented.
+\&'protected' will be documented.
 .IP "\fBDocumentInstanceVariables" 4
 This flag permits you to turn off documentation for instance variables
 completely.  Normally, explicitly declared 'public' or 'protected' instance
@@ -425,7 +423,7 @@
 A filename to be used to output dependency information for make.  This
 will take the form of listing all header and source files known for
 the project as dependencies of the project name (see
-'Project').
+\&'Project').
 .IP "\fBProject" 4
 May be used to specify the name of this project ... determines the
 name of the index reference file produced as part of the documentation
@@ -436,10 +434,10 @@
 the igsdoc index/reference files used by external projects, along
 with values to be used to map the filenames found in the indexes.
 For example, if a project index (igsdoc) file says that the class
-'Foo' is found in the file 'Foo', and the
+\&'Foo' is found in the file 'Foo', and the
 path associated with that project index is '/usr/doc/proj',
 Then generated html output may reference the class as being in
-'/usr/doc/prj/Foo.html' .  Note that a dictionary may be
+\&'/usr/doc/prj/Foo.html' .  Note that a dictionary may be
 given on the command line by using the standard PropertyList format
 (not the XML format of OS X), using semicolons as line-separators, and
 enclosing it in single quotes.
--- gnustep-base.orig/Tools/cvtenc.1
+++ gnustep-base/Tools/cvtenc.1
@@ -29,17 +29,17 @@
 encoding.  If this is not specified, the default encoding for the current
 locale is used.
 .IP "\fB\-EscapeIn\fR \fIYES|NO\fR" 4
-Specify '-EscapeIn YES' (the default is 'NO') to parse the input for \\u
+Specify '\-EscapeIn YES' (the default is 'NO') to parse the input for \\u
 escape sequences (as in property lists).
 .IP "\fB\-EscapeOut\fR \fIYES|NO\fR" 4
-Specify '-EscapeOut YES' (the default is 'NO') to generate \\u escape
+Specify '\-EscapeOut YES' (the default is 'NO') to generate \\u escape
 sequences (as in property lists) in the output.  Note, this might produce
 unexpected results for some encodings.
 .IP "\fB\-Unicode\fR \fIIN|OUT\fR" 4
-Specify '-Unicode IN' (or '-Unicode OUT') to control the direction of
+Specify '\-Unicode IN' (or '\-Unicode OUT') to control the direction of
 conversion rather than having the tool guess it on the basis of the content
-it reads.  Using '-Unicode IN' means that the tool reads UTF16 data and
-writes C-String data, while using '-Unicode OUT' merans that the tool reads
+it reads.  Using '\-Unicode IN' means that the tool reads UTF16 data and
+writes C-String data, while using '\-Unicode OUT' merans that the tool reads
 C-String data and writes UTF16 data.
 
 
--- gnustep-base.orig/Tools/defaults.1
+++ gnustep-base/Tools/defaults.1
@@ -15,9 +15,9 @@
 This program replaces the old NeXTstep style dread, dwrite, and dremove
 programs.
 .PP
-If you have access to another user's defaults database, you may include
-\&'-u username' before any other options to use that user's database rather
-than your own.
+If you have access to another user's defaults database, you may
+include \&'\-u username' before any other options to use that user's
+database rather than your own.
 .PP
 defaults read [ domain [ key] ]
 .IP
@@ -77,7 +77,7 @@
 list options for the defaults command.
 
 .SH FILES
-.IT ~/GNUstep/Defaults/.GNUstepDefaults
+.IP ~/GNUstep/Defaults/.GNUstepDefaults
 holds defaults for a user
 
 .SH BUGS
--- gnustep-base.orig/Tools/gdomap.8
+++ gnustep-base/Tools/gdomap.8
@@ -41,7 +41,7 @@
 .B gdomap
 The gdomap daemon is used by GNUstep programs to look up distributed objects
 of processes running across the network (and between different user accounts
-on a single machine).  The deamon is NOT used for lookup where two processes
+on a single machine).  The daemon is NOT used for lookup where two processes
 belonging to the same user are using a host-local connection.  This
 manual page explains the usage of gdomap.  For design and implementation
 information (and special notes for packagers), please see the HTML
@@ -77,14 +77,14 @@
 The IP addresses should be in standard 'dot' notation, one per line.
 Empty lines are permitted in the configuration file.
 Anything on a line after a hash ('#') is ignored.
-You tell gdomap about the config file with the '-c' command line option.
+You tell gdomap about the config file with the '\-c' command line option.
 .PP
 
 gdomap uses the SIOCGIFCONF ioctl to build a list of IP addresses and
 netmasks for the network interface cards on your machine.  On some operating
 systems, this facility is not available (or is broken), so you must tell
-gdomap the addresses and masks of the interfaces using the '-a' command line
-option.  The file named with '-a' should contain a series of lines with
+gdomap the addresses and masks of the interfaces using the '\-a' command line
+option.  The file named with '\-a' should contain a series of lines with
 space separated pairs of addresses and masks in 'dot' notation.
 You must NOT include loopback interfaces in this list.
 If you want to support broadcasting of probe information on a network,
--- gnustep-base.orig/Tools/pldes.1
+++ gnustep-base/Tools/pldes.1
@@ -14,19 +14,19 @@
 .SH SYNOPSIS
 .nf
 .BI "pldes " "filename(s)"
-.nl
+.nf
 .BI "plget " "key" [ more keys ]
-.nl
+.nf
 .BI "plser " "filename(s)"
-.nl
+.nf
 .BI "plmerge [ " "destination-file" " ] [ " "input-file(s)" " ]"
-.nl
+.nf
 .BI "plparse " "filename(s)"
-.nl
+.nf
 .BI "pl2link " "input-file" " [ " "destination-file" " ]"
-.nl
+.nf
 .BI "plio -input [ " "input-file" " ] " " -output [ " "destination-file" " ]"
-.nl
+.nf
 
 .SH DESCRIPTION
 .P